Review: Planted: A Story of Creation, Calling and Community by Leah Kostamo

If he wantonly crushes ants for the fun of it, odds are he won’t be too concerned about the suffering and demise of larger species, including, studies have show, his own. – Leah Kostamo

Planted Leah Kostamo

I just finished the book “Planted: A Story of Creation, Calling and Community,” published by Cascade Books. What initially caught my attention about it was Eugene Peterson’s raving forward of the book. He writes,

When I sat down to read the manuscript that became this book, I intended to read for twenty minutes and then go back to working on my manuscript…Five hours later I turned the last page with a sense that I was participating in the remarkable story of people who ventured into seriously caring for creation in a highly unusual way – establishing an Environmental Center for the care of creation, God’s creation. Continue reading Review: Planted: A Story of Creation, Calling and Community by Leah Kostamo

A friend sent this article by Wendell Berry the other day and said it was worth the read, he is right. The article looks at how our insatiable desire for more not only has adverse effects on our lives and economy but also on our environment. This limitlessness that’s rooted in an Englightenment mentality of progress is not only unchristian but ultimately destructive. He says,

The problem with us is not only prodigal extravagance but also an assumed limitlessness. We have obscured the issue by refusing to see that limitlessness is a godly trait. We have insistently, and with relief, defined ourselves as animals or as “higher animals.?? But to define ourselves as animals, given our specifically human powers and desires, is to define ourselves as limitless animals—which of course is a contradiction in terms. Any definition is a limit, which is why the God of Exodus refuses to define Himself: “I am that I am.??

And his point is that we do need limits, that this is the way things really work. He writes:

It is the artists, not the scientists, who have dealt unremittingly with the problem of limits. A painting, however large, must finally be bounded by a frame or a wall. A composer or playwright must reckon, at a minimum, with the capacity of an audience to sit still and pay attention. A story, once begun, must end somewhere within the limits of the writer’s and the reader’s memory. And of course the arts characteristically impose limits that are artificial: the five acts of a play, or the fourteen lines of a sonnet. Within these limits artists achieve elaborations of pattern, of sustaining relationships of parts with one another and with the whole, that may be astonishingly complex. And probably most of us can name a painting, a piece of music, a poem or play or story that still grows in meaning and remains fresh after many years of familiarity.

Read the rest of the article, he uses Militon and Christopher Marlowe’s Tragical History of Doctor Faustus to help make his point. it’s very thought provoking and well argued.

Faustian economics: Hell hath no limits—By Wendell Berry (Harper’s Magazine).

Bloggers Join Blog Action Day Oct. 15

Some of you may be interested in joining in the event planned for this Monday. Blogactionday.org is calling for all bloggers to discuss one issue, the environment. They’ve are already close to 14,000 blogs who have signed up to write something. I’ve got a couple ideas up my sleeves, but not sure which one I am going to use yet (I don’t want it to be a repeat for those of you whole already know how I feel about the issue). If you’re interested in checking out more about the what the Blog Action Day site has put together, check out their great list of compiled websites and other resources on their resource page. And here is a short intro video they’ve put together for YouTube.
Continue reading Bloggers Join Blog Action Day Oct. 15