#Sketchnotes and The Writing Process

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[This is an image of a sketchnote used for a sermon on Luke 13]

There’s a really interesting article about sketching that Mike Rohde linked too from Smashing Magazine titled Hand-Sketching: Things You Didn’t Know Your Doodles Could Accomplish. The whole thing is worth read if your interested in the topic. It is about the usefulness of handwriting and sketching as a way to help reorganize your thinking, remember things better, and be more creative. In the article, Laura Busche, offers some helpful research to buttress these points.

Continue reading #Sketchnotes and The Writing Process

When it’s over, I want to say: all my life I was a bride married to amazement.

When death comes by Mary Oliver

When death comes
like the hungry bear in autumn
when death comes and takes all the bright coins from his purse

to buy me, and snaps his purse shut;
when death comes
like the measle-pox;

when death comes
like an iceberg between the shoulder blades,

I want to step through the door full of curiosity, wondering;
what is it going to be like, that cottage of darkness?

And therefore I look upon everything
as a brotherhood and a sisterhood,
and I look upon time as no more than an idea,
and I consider eternity as another possibility,

and I think of each life as a flower, as common
as a field daisy, and as singular,

and each name a comfortable music in the mouth
tending as all music does, toward silence,

and each body a lion of courage, and something
precious to the earth.

When it’s over, I want to say: all my life
I was a bride married to amazement.
I was a bridegroom, taking the world into my arms.

When it’s over, I don’t want to wonder
if I have made of my life something particular, and real.
I don’t want to find myself sighing and frightened
or full of argument.

I don’t want to end up simply having visited this world.

When Death Comes — Mary Oliver.

Remixing the Bible

I bumped into this little cover image for the bible a few days ago and it got me thinking what people find acceptable when it comes to redesigning or “remixing” the bible through art. This has been happening for centuries. Sacred text depicted in art-form is nothing new.* This particular image is not ground-breaking in anyway that I can tell, but I appreciate the fact that it is a cover that tries to depict something a little different about scripture. The idea was motivated by someone wanting to create a cover for “non-card-carrying Christians” is weird because the old handy-dandy black cover seems nondescript enough to not draw attention if that’s the goal, whereas a cover with hot-pink and other bright colors will do the opposite. Continue reading Remixing the Bible