And today, I say farewell to my beloved church

Here is a bit of what we did today as a farewell to our ministry at Camas Friends Church.

“Therefore, my brothers and sisters, whom I love and long for, my joy and crown, stand firm in the Lord in this way, my beloved…

Rejoice [Farewell] in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice [Farewell]. Let your gentleness be known to everyone. The Lord is near. Do not worry about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Finally, beloved, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is pleasing, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence and if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. Keep on doing the things that you have learned and received and heard and seen in me, and the God of peace will be with you…

The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ be with your spirit.” -Philippians 3:21–4:13 Continue reading And today, I say farewell to my beloved church

Convergent Model of Renewal: Discussion Guide and Sketchnotes (Chp. 2)

Daniels_AConvergentModelofRenewal_01193_copyWe are doing a discussion at Camas Friends Church on my book, “A Convergent Model of Renewal.” I am posting the sketchnotes and  discussion questions here each week for anyone who would like to download them and use them. Feel free to share and dispense however that makes sense as usual things are shared here under the creative commons 4.0 “share and share alike” designation.

Resource Guide

Download: Sketchnotes: Chapter 2 Sketchnotes.

Download: Discussion Guide Intro, Chapter 1 and Chapter 2.

Download: Chapter One Resources

What Makes for a Good Remix?

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What makes for a good remix? This is a question that comes up a lot when I present on themes related to my book, “A Convergent Model of Renewal: Remixing the Quaker Tradition in a Participatory Culture.” When we talk about how tradition can be revitalized and “remixed” within new cultures people ask how do we know that it is still a part of the same tradition?

Here are some basic thoughts on it.

  1. The original piece of art, sample, text, etc. is recognizable. The connection or reference to what the remix is drawing on is accessible those within that particular community.

  2. There is genuinely something new about the remix. It is clear that it is original in some way. And this originality often leverages the past, while shedding new light or a new perspective on the old in a truly innovative way.

  3. It works. Everything fits together in a new seamless production. There is a big difference between Lee Major in the “Six Million Dollar Man” and Frankenstein. The keys match, the beats line up. Whatever contradictions may have previously existed they are resolved within the new piece of art.

  4. It is participatory: it moves people on the dance floor. Another way to say this is that it is affirmed, as well as created, through a consensus process within the community that is directly affected by the remix. The community is invested in the outcome of what is created.

  5. It remains open to more remixes and modifications. It would be both tragic and ironic if a remix became proprietary, dogmatic and restricted under copyright. What is created through an open-ended process must seek to affirm further developments, remixes and new ways of sampling.

Download this sketchnote as a .pdf

 

Exploring a Rhythm of Life, Creativity, and Leadership from the Quaker Tradition with Rhett Smith

Rhett Smith Podcast 6: Exploring a Rhythm of Life, Creativity, and Leadership from the Quaker Tradition — with Theologian, Professor and Writer, Wess Daniels.

Rhett and I became friends at Fuller Seminary when I was working on my Masters in Theology and he was working on his Masters in Family Therapy. He and I have remained connected even though he now lives in TX. I’ve always appreciated his insights and he has helped me countless times on pastoral care issues and other questions I’ve had around leadership. So you can imagine my delight to have him invite me to be interviewed for his podcast.

In this podcast we discuss a lot of different things such as:

  • leadership in the Quaker tradition (flattened leadership)
  • what participatory culture looks like
  • developing weekly rhythms of self-care
  • harnessing creativity in our work (i.e. sketchnotes)

Rhett Smith Podcast 6: Exploring a Rhythm of Life, Creativity, and Leadership from the Quaker Tradition

Our Big News About Guilford College

This was recently posted to Guilford College’s website:

C. Wess Daniels has been named the William R. Rogers Director of Friends Center and Quaker Studies, succeeding Max Carter, who will retire this summer after 25 years at Guilford.

Wess has been a full-time Quaker minister, educator, researcher and public theologian, and has been working toward cultivating renewal among all branches of the Religious Society of Friends. For the past 5½ years, he has served as Quaker pastor at Camas (Wash.) Friends church, a programmed meeting in the Northwest Yearly Meeting.

As a doctoral student at Fuller Theological Seminary in California, his area of research was renewal of the Quaker tradition within contemporary context. He created a model of renewal for use by Quakers and all faith traditions and, in July 2014, received his Ph.D. from Fuller’s School of Intercultural Studies.

“With his skills and experience and a commitment to Quaker renewal and participatory culture, it is my strong belief that Wess is the right person at the right time to fill the leadership role as our William R. Rogers Director of Friends Center and Quaker Studies,” said President Jane K. Fernandes. “I am very pleased that we have reached a successful conclusion to the search for this essential position helping to assure that the Quaker ethos remains a vital force on campus.”

Read more here.

It is with great excitement and a deep sense of humility and call that I have accepted this position. Emily, the kids and I are also very very sad to be leaving Camas Friends Church, a community we deeply love and have poured our hearts out for over these past 6 years. They will also be embedded within our spiritual DNAs, our memories, and life narratives. Without Camas Friends, I would not be who I am today. They have been good teachers, co-laborers and dear Friends.

I found the Friends Center and Guilford College to be world-class. I’m convinced that the work they are doing there is not only important but is at its core renewal work. I believe that the students and staff there will continue to have an impact in and beyond the Quaker world and I am so excited to have an opportunity to work alongside people there. I look forward to the many challenges and learning opportunities there and hope that I can make a meaningful contribution to the life of the community there.

The outpouring of love and support on Facebook has been overwhelming and not anything like what I would have expected. Now my attention turns to leaving Camas Friends as well as I can and helping them and my own family transition. Prayers for grace, patience, and God’s guidance for all.

Meeting for Readings and How to Do Them

Mikel Birkel’s book “Engaging Scripture” Reading the Bible with Early Friends,” is a fantastic book that is helpful not just for Quakers but for anyone looking for different ways of reading Scripture (inwardly, meditatively, together, lectio, for transformation, etc.). It’s a book we’ve used in a variety of settings at Camas Friends Church and people really love it.

One of the things we’ve done Sunday morning a few times is what Birkel calls a “meeting for reading.” A meeting for reading isn’t exactly like the silent reading parties that go on up in Seattle and other cities, but it’s a great idea. Continue reading Meeting for Readings and How to Do Them